"I don’t think I had a clear conscious thought about the chemistry until it started to be brought to my attention. You know, by, you know doing press and people saying: ‘What about chemistry between you and David?’ It was definitely there, it still is. I mean, there’s something that can’t be explained about it. It’s no rhyme or reason. [laughs] You know, it’s just there when we are together in front of the camera, and even … [pause] … well, generally in front of the camera [laughs].”
Gillian AndersonThe X-Files Official Site, June 2002
Zoom Info

"I don’t think I had a clear conscious thought about the chemistry until it started to be brought to my attention. You know, by, you know doing press and people saying: ‘What about chemistry between you and David?’ It was definitely there, it still is. I mean, there’s something that can’t be explained about it. It’s no rhyme or reason. [laughs] You know, it’s just there when we are together in front of the camera, and even … [pause] … well, generally in front of the camera [laughs].”
Gillian AndersonThe X-Files Official Site, June 2002
Zoom Info

"I don’t think I had a clear conscious thought about the chemistry until it started to be brought to my attention. You know, by, you know doing press and people saying: ‘What about chemistry between you and David?’ It was definitely there, it still is. I mean, there’s something that can’t be explained about it. It’s no rhyme or reason. [laughs] You know, it’s just there when we are together in front of the camera, and even … [pause] … well, generally in front of the camera [laughs].”

Gillian Anderson
The X-Files Official Site, June 2002
tropicobelair:

On my way home from my second trip to London of the year. That place has me hooked. This time, I went with my mum to see Gillian in Streetcar. It was amazing, the way the room fell silent as she walked in. You don’t fully appreciate how petite she is until you see her up close. She walked in, glamour radiating from her, and everyone in the theatre barely breathed. The young vic is a very unique stage, it’s in a hexagon with the actual stage in the middle. It rotates, which is very useful: at some point, the action is always within touching distance. I was in the second and back row of the top floor, and so on some occasions they were at eye level with me and I could see down on all of the stage. 
It was a very intense performance. I have so much admiration for the whole cast, it’s not stop and high octane. It looks physically exhausting. I loved it. I had deliberately only read the play before I went and not seen any other adaptations, but I know that nothing will quite compare to this. It was unique, it was invigorating, it was exciting. 
Obviously, the reason I went was to see Gillian in real life. She is such a role model for me, it was amazing to finally have her in the same room as me, and she was as every bit as captivating as she is on the small screen. My mum commented on how skinny she is and how well she walks in heels. I hope when I am Gillian’s age I am that kind of woman: feminine and yet fiercely driven and busy. She obviously enjoys and takes great pride in her work, all traits I have a huge amount of respect for. It’s harrowing to see her unravelling as Blanche screams on the ground, but that’s how wonderfully she acts - you forget she isn’t Blanche, nor is she Stella or Scully and yet immediately these iconic women come to mind when you think of Gillian Anderson. She consumes a role, it does not consume her, for she keeps growing and changing and adapting. On stage, all eyes were on her. At the end, she awkwardly bowed to all parts of the audience. She almost looked as if she felt she did not deserve the praise. She said no words, but when she made eye contact with the audience you know that it was not through rudeness or the fact she believed herself to be above it, I feel that she was truly too shy too, like she had no words to convey her feelings about the fact she caused the whole thing to sell out twice and cause all the drama she has at the young vic. At the end, I know a lot of people stick around to see her and I thought about it but at the time I didn’t feel it was right, I just felt that she must be exhausted and would just want to go home. I know I would. However, with hindsight I realise that she probably quite enjoys it. Ah well. I am seriously contemplating going down again just for that part, but I will have to see how funds go. 
I hope everyone else who is going enjoys their experience as much as I did. I am so, so glad I went as I know she will probably never do anything like this again. Saying that, I am sure the young vic will be desperate to have her back so we may get lucky! I know that if I they do I will be there once again, loving every second.

tropicobelair:

On my way home from my second trip to London of the year. That place has me hooked. This time, I went with my mum to see Gillian in Streetcar. It was amazing, the way the room fell silent as she walked in. You don’t fully appreciate how petite she is until you see her up close. She walked in, glamour radiating from her, and everyone in the theatre barely breathed. The young vic is a very unique stage, it’s in a hexagon with the actual stage in the middle. It rotates, which is very useful: at some point, the action is always within touching distance. I was in the second and back row of the top floor, and so on some occasions they were at eye level with me and I could see down on all of the stage.
It was a very intense performance. I have so much admiration for the whole cast, it’s not stop and high octane. It looks physically exhausting. I loved it. I had deliberately only read the play before I went and not seen any other adaptations, but I know that nothing will quite compare to this. It was unique, it was invigorating, it was exciting.
Obviously, the reason I went was to see Gillian in real life. She is such a role model for me, it was amazing to finally have her in the same room as me, and she was as every bit as captivating as she is on the small screen. My mum commented on how skinny she is and how well she walks in heels. I hope when I am Gillian’s age I am that kind of woman: feminine and yet fiercely driven and busy. She obviously enjoys and takes great pride in her work, all traits I have a huge amount of respect for. It’s harrowing to see her unravelling as Blanche screams on the ground, but that’s how wonderfully she acts - you forget she isn’t Blanche, nor is she Stella or Scully and yet immediately these iconic women come to mind when you think of Gillian Anderson. She consumes a role, it does not consume her, for she keeps growing and changing and adapting. On stage, all eyes were on her. At the end, she awkwardly bowed to all parts of the audience. She almost looked as if she felt she did not deserve the praise. She said no words, but when she made eye contact with the audience you know that it was not through rudeness or the fact she believed herself to be above it, I feel that she was truly too shy too, like she had no words to convey her feelings about the fact she caused the whole thing to sell out twice and cause all the drama she has at the young vic. At the end, I know a lot of people stick around to see her and I thought about it but at the time I didn’t feel it was right, I just felt that she must be exhausted and would just want to go home. I know I would. However, with hindsight I realise that she probably quite enjoys it. Ah well. I am seriously contemplating going down again just for that part, but I will have to see how funds go.
I hope everyone else who is going enjoys their experience as much as I did. I am so, so glad I went as I know she will probably never do anything like this again. Saying that, I am sure the young vic will be desperate to have her back so we may get lucky! I know that if I they do I will be there once again, loving every second.